Have you been involved in an office accident and need to file a workers’ comp claim? An office injury lawyer at Wilson, Reives & Silverman will fight to prove your claims and help get you the disability benefits you deserve.

Has a doctor written you out of work because of a job-related injury? The lawyers at Wilson, Reives and Silverman will fight to prove your claim and get you the disability benefits you deserve.

Are you already out of work receiving temporary total disability benefits? An injury that causes temporary total disability can be scary and cause you to think about whether you will get fired from your job. There are protections outside of workers’ compensation that can help protect your job such as FMLA and REDA laws. If you are receiving a weekly check for your workers’ compensation claim and are worried about your job security, call Wilson, Reives and Silverman. Our attorneys will provide a free consultation and explain all your rights and answer any questions you may have. Office safety topics are included in almost every employee handbook – but unfortunately, these don’t prevent office injuries or construction accidents from happening. The injuries sustained can be extremely painful, and they can also keep you from performing your job and earning the salary you depend on.

What Are Temporary Total Disability (TTD) Benefits?

Temporary total disability is a form of compensation (payment of money) given to an injured worker who is not able to return to work for his/her employer as a result of an on the job injury. If the employer and insurance company have admitted that your injury entitles you to workers’ compensation benefits, TTD is one of the forms of payment that you are entitled to receive.

TTD is paid out to the injured worker who is totally written out of work by an authorized physician for a temporary period of time. This temporary period can last up to 500 weeks and beyond if certain facts about the injury are met.

How Are Temporary Total Disability (TTD) Benefits Calculated?

TTD benefits are calculated by taking 66 2/3% of the average gross (pre-tax) wage earned by the injured worker in the 52 weeks preceding the injury. If the worker was on the job for less than 52 weeks, those wages may be used to calculate the pay-rate. There are other methods that can be used to make this calculation as well if needed.

It is not uncommon for an employer to use net (post-tax) wages or to estimate earnings when calculating benefits. If you feel like you are getting less money than you are entitled to, contact the lawyers and Wilson, Reives and Silverman and we will discuss your rights during your free consultation.

Contact Wilson, Reives & Silverman to learn more about your legal rights.

Contact Us